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The Difference Between A Conservatory and A Orangery Explained.

Posted: Thursday, 29 June 2017 @ 12:04

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If you have been considering installing a glass extension, but you are unsure of the differences between a conservatory and an orangery then this article is perfect for you.

Factors like space, time, budget, planning permission and personal preference will be deciding factors to which glass extension will best suit your home.

Find out which glass extension is best going to grace your property….

Conservatories

A conservatory is mainly constructed using glass; in fact around 80% of the building is made from glass. Other materials used in the build can include timber, uPVC and aluminium for the frames and small dwarf brick walls can be added if required. Modern day conservatories are manufactured using the latest glazing technology and with the correct ventilation and heating they can be used all year round.

Conservatories can be used for many purposes, but they are most suitable for dining rooms, sun rooms, and additional living space. Due to the mass of glass the conservatory provides the views you have of the garden are really quite spectacular and if fitted with modern day bi folding doors the uninterrupted parametric views which you gain are to be truly envied.

The glass panels and roofing makes a conservatory a light and airy space to either relax or entertain.

Unlike an orangery the conservatory doesn’t quite seamlessly join the original building, but it does make its own statement with classic designs such as the Edwardian, the Victorian and the simple Lean to conservatory to name just a few styles you can choose from. When adding a new conservatory then consider the age and style of your home and choose a style that will complement the original building. Lean To Conservatories are a popular choice as they suit traditional and modern properties.

A conservatory is far more than a white glass box on the back of your property, nowadays you are able to commission bespoke designs and even colour match uPVC frames to match your windows and doors.

Compared to an Orangery a conservatory is easier, quicker and cheaper to install. This makes them a very desirable and affordable way to extend your home.

As a rule conservatories generally do not require planning permission.

The average cost of a conservatory is around £5000, this will depend of course on the materials used, the area you live in and the size of the actually conservatory.

Orangeries

The main difference between the conservatory and an orangery has to be; it has far more structural work than a conservatory with pillars and columns and also has a different roofing system.

The pillars, columns and roof give the orangery a more solid feel and it is built to seamlessly match the original building giving the impression it has always been part of the house just like a good brick built extension manages to achieve.

The pillars and columns also provide a bit more privacy than the fully glazed conservatory. These internal walls are also useful when it comes to arranging furniture and displaying wall art.

Orangeries can be styled to suit your requirements, enabling you to choose different window, doors and roofing options.

It has to be said that an orangery is going to cost more money and this is due to the additional materials used and the man hours needs to construct it. You will be looking at paying around £20,000 plus for a beautiful bespoke orangery.

On the plus side an orangery will not only add additional living space, but can also add up to 15% to your home’s value, making it a worthwhile investment.

Find out more about – conservatories and orangeries here.

REHAU Quality - Authorised Partner
Planitherm Installer Network
British Fenestration Rating Council
Certass
CE
Global Conservatory Roof
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