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Could a Glass Shortage Hold Up Your Construction?

Posted: Thursday, 29 June 2017 @ 12:04

When you’re planning a new build, whether it’s a small home conservatory or a large scale commercial project, you can expect setbacks at every turn. However, you’d be forgiven for presuming that a glass shortage wouldn’t be behind any problems, as it’s something that’s relatively unheard of.

Livin-Room-PVCU-Conservatory-1

However, that’s just what happening over in the US. There’s an official glass shortage, stemming from the recession which hit in 2008, and it means that a number of building projects have ground to a halt. The technology industry has also been affected, for example makers of LCD screens – for which demand is always on the rise.

Last month The Wall Street Journal reported on the problem, which has caused issues for the construction of new glass skyscrapers and sent the price of glass soaring due to demand. Without enough glass to go around, architects and developers are in trouble and many projects remain unfinished.

Back in 2008, there wasn’t enough project to buy up the large scale glass which was being produced – this led to the closure of 11 glass factories. Now though, the construction industry is booming which has seen demand for glass, especially for skyscrapers, soar. The remaining glass factories simply can’t keep up with demand, unable to produce the glass fast enough for the projects all over the US.

Glass gives that modern, minimalistic look which is sought after by many designers and developers today. This is why many new projects require a large amount of commercial glass, especially for commercial buildings. The shortage, however, is slowing down construction and means developers will either have to look for alternative materials, or do something about it themselves – which one company, Related Cos, has decided to do. Rather than waiting around for glass to be produced, it has branched out into the glass making industry to manufacture it themselves.

This isn’t the first time a glass shortage has slowed down the construction industry – but it is the first time for almost a century. In the 1920s, it was reported that many glass making machines were destroyed during the First World War which made it difficult for the booming demand from countries in Europe.

There’s no need to worry if you’re planning on a domestic renovation which requires glass, such as a conservatory or orangery. We have all your glass needs sorted for windows and doors at Prior Products!

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