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Choosing The Right Type Of Glass Extension

Posted: Friday, 19 August 2016 @ 12:51

conservatory-orangeryWith so many choices of glass extensions on the market it’s hard to know which one you should choose.

Many factors will come into play when choosing the right extension for your home from, in some cases having to apply for planning permission, your budget, timescales, its purpose, the land you have available and the overall look and feel you want to create.

Adding a glass extension will give you the additional living space you desire as well as adding monetary value, but what is the right type of glass extension for you?

Let’s look at some of the glass extensions available;

 

 

 

Victorian-PVCU-Conservatory-6The Classic Conservatory

A conservatory is probably the easiest and cheapest way to extend your property. With so many choices of styles, materials and sizes it’s no surprise to find out approx. 20% of homes in the UK have a conservatory.

There are numerous styles of conservatories to choose from; Edwardian, Victorian, Lean To, and the Gable End. Some styles work well with all property types, but generally speaking matching the age of your home with a style that enhances and complements your home is the best choice when choosing the design.

There tends to be 3 types of materials used to manufacture conservatories; uPVC, timber and aluminium. Today’s modern glazing means that conservatories can be used all year round. The new glass used nowadays provides solar protection, thermal qualities and are totally energy efficient.

Veranda-conservatory-PVCu-green-1The Veranda Conservatory

The Veranda conservatory differs from other conservatories and this is why we are going to discuss it as a separate option. The unique roofing system is what makes this style of conservatory so different from the other styles we have mentioned above.

The Veranda conservatory has taken conservatories to a new level. The unique extended glass roof provides a glass shelter that extends out from the conservatory creating a glass covered area over the patio or decking area. The conservatory is built using full glazed panels allowing unrestricted views of the garden and allows the maximum amount of light into the home. If more privacy or a more solid look is wanted, then walls can be incorporated into the build alongside the glass panels.

Livin-Room-PVCU-Conservatory-1Livin Room Conservatories

Another conservatory that differs from the other classic conservatories is the Livin Room conservatory. Again it is the way the roof is constructed that gives it its unique feature. The roof has a plastered perimeter, creating a solid ceiling around the inside of the roof.

This gives the extension a more solid feel, but it also benefits from having a fully glazed lantern styled roof, allowing the natural light to enter the room the same way a conservatory roof does. The perimeter ceiling forms a perfect area for the installation of downlights.

Orangeries

PVCU-OrangeryOrangeries have more brick work than a conservatory, the walls create columns and pillars mixed with a combination of glassed panels; this is then covered by a glazed roof with internal plastered ceilings similar to the livin room conservatory roof. Orangeries are built to complement the original house blending into the house as if it was always there, a bit like a good brick extension manages to achieve.

Orangeries work well for kitchen extensions as they have a good balance of brick and glazing products, they also make excellent living spaces, studies, dining rooms the list is endless really.

Due to the amount of work that goes into building an orangery the costs are considerably more. There are more materials used when constructing an orangery compared to installing a glass conservatory and this too increases the price.

The guidelines regarding planning permission for a conservatory or an orangery are as follows:

  • Conservatories and orangeries must not exceed or cover in excess of 50% of the size of the house
  • Should not exceed 4 meters in height
  • Should not include any Verandas, Balconies or Elevated Platforms
  • Should not be more than half the width of the house
  • Should not have eaves higher than 3 meters if within 2 meters of a structure boundary

Please check with your local council if you have any concerns or questions in relation to planning permission, you can learn more about planning permission at: http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/permission/

We hope that has helped you identify the options available to you when looking for a new glass extension. If you need more information please get in touch!

REHAU Quality - Authorised Partner
Planitherm Installer Network
British Fenestration Rating Council
Certass
CE
Global Conservatory Roof
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